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How can social media help build social capital and social trust?

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Is social media good or bad for community and social relationships? This has been a hot topic of debate between so-called "cyber-optimists" and "cyber-pessimists". But frankly, we're less absorbed by the debate over whether the Internet is bad or good than we are by the very urgent need to make it as good as possible.

Because the Internet isn't going anywhere. Neither is our need for the social relationships that power organizations, sustain communities and give meaning to our personal lives. That's why we focus on the ways that social media can help nurture social capital and social trust by reconstituting social ties, and helping people connect in new ways.

Read more about how Alex's research into building social capital informs our approach to engaging online participation in social media.

learn more

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